PROGRESS: Chapters 1 – 15 Top Matches

Courtney & I were talking on the podcast this week about our favorite matches so far. I feel like 15 is a point to pause and reflect on what we’ve seen so far. My original list of “top matches” was 27 matches long. The card with the MOST matches I loved was Chapter 11, for anyone curious. Here is my list, in no particular order. What are YOUR favorites?

Progress World Cup: Jimmy Havoc vs. Prince Devitt for the Progress Championship

This match was deliciously brutal. Tons of blood, but it was used in a way that was different from any of Jimmy’s other bloody matches. This was less about him being a hardcore wrestler and more about the gimmick Devitt was rocking this time around. It was an awesome sendoff to Devitt, too, who heads off to NXT the following month.

Chapter 5 – Nathan Cruz vs. Rampage Brown

This was really the first match during my Progress journey that absolutely floored me. I had been enjoying Cruz up to this point, but this match was so intense that afterwards I wanted to start it over and watch again. This was an amazing way to be introduced to Rampage Brown, as well.

Chapter 15: Pete Dunne vs. Flash Morgan Webster

Courtney and I talked at great length about this one on the podcast. It’s slightly easier to see the future Bruiserweight in Dunne here than in his first match, but him and Webster are such a great pairing. I hope they cross paths again in the future, as this match could’ve been an Iron Man and I’d have been thrilled.

Chapter 11: El Ligero vs. Noam Dar

Finally, the crowd loves Noam Dar. This is the third time we see these two face off, and it really is the best of their matches. In 2+ years, they both grew a bit and found their footing with the Progress audience, so this match connects in a way the first two fell short of. A thing of beauty.

Progress World Cup: Grado vs. Noam Dar in a Progress World Cup Tournament Round 1 match

Of all the comedy matches that Progress has done, this was my favorite. I liked that it was a tournament match so it had stakes. But it also had comedic psychology (??) in that they structured it around these WWE-mocking spots. Just beautiful.

Chapter 14: FSU vs. The London Riots for the Progress Tag Team Championship

Honestly, no other tag team match that Progress has done so far can touch this one. There was so much tension between the two teams – so much rage – that it was bound to be an explosion. I was glued to the screen the entire time, and it only enforced my love of both teams even more.

Chapter 7: Jimmy Havoc vs. Zack Sabre Jr. with Nigel McGuinness as a guest referee

Jimmy is endearing, funny, and a little nutty up to this point – this is really where you fall in love with him. You know from Chapter 1 that ZSJ is the real deal, so watching Jimmy really hang with him as the match goes on creates a deeper love for him as a fan. It makes what comes later even more painful.

Chapter 7: Will Ospreay vs. Mark Andrews in a Natural Progression Tournament Round 1 re-match

The first one of these was wonderful, but the rematch has such higher stakes that it’s hard for it NOT to top the original. Watching Andrews and Ospreay push themselves to their limits is overwhelming. Nothing beats Ospreay kicking out from a pinfall and screaming at Andrews “I AIN’T FUCKING LEAVING!”

Chapter 10 – Mark Andrews vs. Paul Robinson in the Natural Progression Tournament Final

Everything that comes after this match is like a baseball bat to the gut – just stunning and excruciating. But don’t let all that juicy storytelling overshadow that this is probably the very best match in a Progress ring up to this point. Andrews and Robinson move with ease together, and are even trying new things out for the Progress audience. With Dennis and Ospreay in the audience, the emotion is turned up even more.

Chapter 9 – Ricochet vs. Mark Haskins vs. Zack Sabre Jr.

This is the only time I’ve felt a strong connection to Haskins, and that’s mostly due to his willingness to bump for Ricochet and ZSJ. I love how different their styles are, too, and yet how well they all blend together in this match. Triple threats can be a clusterfuck if not properly planned and executed – this is how you do a triple threat match well.

– The Lady J Says

 

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PROGRESS: To Begin With

Last night, I was staring at my computer screen and the words just wouldn’t come. Nothing is more frustrating as a writer than when you have a topic you are passionate about, something you’ve talked a great length about before, but when it comes time to sit down and write about it, the words wouldn’t come. So this morning, I got up and made breakfast, and sat down to think about something else – anything else. What popped into my mind was the movie Almost Famous.

Sometimes I feel like that movie’s protagonist, William Miller. Not because I’m two years younger than my mother told me I was, or because I’ve traveled the country with my favorite band. I just keep finding myself in these wonderful, interesting situations that you don’t realize, until you step back and get a little perspective on them, make up a life. In my case they are not music related (or, I should say, they are not usually music-related) but more often than not have to do with wrestling.

For several months now, people have been telling me to give the UK promotion PROGRESS a shot. The thought of paying for one more wrestling streaming service kept me from listening to them. In November, I wrote a blog post about an incredible promo cut by Pete Dunne, Trent Seven, and Tyler Bate (who are currently the holders of PROGRESS’s Championship and Tag Team titles, respectively.) I enjoyed it so much, I promised myself that when I was in a financial position to do so, the next thing I would do was sit down and watch everything PROGRESS had to offer me. That time came this past Wednesday.

Since then, I have started the process of watching all of PROGRESS in order, starting (as one does) with Chapter 1. Naturally, when I began I had a great deal of questions. Was there a context I was missing? Not only was I concerned about things I might miss because these early shows are five years old and what happens between them might be lost on me (for example, Jimmy Havoc had a twitter campaign to get himself on PROGRESS’s second show that they called #BookHavoc) but I was also concerned about the cultural context of my not being from the UK. Surely there would be jokes made by the audience (and trust me, they LOVE jokes in the audience at PROGRESS) that just went entirely over my head. That’s where Twitter came in:

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Every possible question I had, though, was answered by someone on Twitter. I was even provided with a link to a thread on the Voices of Wrestling forum that provides a breakdown of each chapter and Youtube videos for anyone who might be looking for those aforementioned in-between moments & storylines.

As if having a helpful cacophony of PROGRESS fans answering my questions wasn’t enough, the second thing that happened was the response to my general thoughts on what I was seeing, from the matches to the commentary and everything in between. In wrestling, as with everything, there are often fans who feel they have ownership over their favorite promotions and wrestlers. These are the people who are quick to say things like “well, I’ve loved them since 2003, when they were still running out of a barn” or other such nonsense. That’s not PROGRESS fans, at least none of the ones I’ve encountered. Not only are they helpful, they seem genuinely excited to see a new person (just one! I’m only one person!) get into this promotion that they so adore. They get more excited as I experience moments of foreshadowing, and some of them are taking great joy in messaging me things like “I’m so glad you liked that, but JUST WAIT!” Conversely, they reassure me when there are missteps along the way, as the chapters I’m working through are still the first shows of a fledgling promotion.

In chapters 1 through 4, everyone is making it up as they go along. The promoters, the wrestlers, the audience – all of the players involved are working out what PROGRESS is, and what they want it to be. Having already experienced Chapter 41 (December, 2016) I know they eventually start booking women (noticeably absent from the early chapters) and they generally accept a more welcoming and inclusive attitude. Not that there is anything in the first four chapters that I think is so offensive I would turn it off, but there is definitely some language use that would turn people off. The benefit here is in hindsight, and I know it gets better, in large part because people keep telling me it does.

During Chapter 1, I decided to take notes. This is typical behavior for me when I’m going to podcast about something (i.e. Lucha Underground) and I think at some point my wonderful friend Courtney and I will be doing that. In looking over the eighteen pages of notes I have for the first four chapters, I notice one thing that is new for me: notes of moves and maneuvers. Not that I normally overlook such things, as naturally they are incredibly important, but there is something about PROGRESS that just makes the wrestling itself stand out. There are excellent storylines in PROGRESS, and everyone knows how much I love a good story. I expect as we move into the chapters from 2013, their storytelling abilities will only improve. But the individuals in the ring provide such clear opportunities to experience and appreciate quality wrestling. While I’m sure many people would argue over the exact definition of what British Strong Style wrestling is, I would say that a huge part of it is thoughtful wrestling. This is not to say it is, by any means, slow wrestling, or boring. But there is an intellect to what is done; you can see the thought process of each wrestler demonstrated in what their bodies do. This is an incredible feat, when you really think about it: the motion of your body is an expression of how you think as a human.

PROGRESS is fun, and it’s funny. A great deal of this is owed to the audience, and the wrestler’s relationship with them. If you are a wrestler who shows up at PROGRESS with no intention of interacting with the crowd, be warned: they will MAKE YOU. It appears that the wrestlers who “get over” with the crowd (as either a face or a heel, it doesn’t really matter) are the ones who shout back at them, or give in to their ridiculous chants – Jimmy Havoc spooning his opponents, Noam Dar throwing shortbread at the crowd, Will Ospreay starting his own Hufflepuff chant against Mark Andrews. The PROGRESS crowd loves their performers, even the bad guys, and it seems clear that the wrestlers love them back.

I don’t really know how we get from the storylines of Chapter 4: The Battle of El Ligero to Chapter 41: Unboxing Live. I imagine there will be great moments and missteps along the way, things will certainly morph and change, but I have never in my life been so excited to see all of it. If you’re interested in following along with me, or wish to start your own journey into PROGRESS’s history, check out their On Demand service. I hope to work through the whole thing in the next four months, as I have a trip to the UK planned for the end of May and would love to get to see a PROGRESS show live. In the meantime, you can follow along with me on Twitter, and hopefully there will be more blog posts and a few podcast episodes along the way. PROGRESS chapters are meaty and dense (there is a joke somewhere in there about their wrestlers) and so it will take some time for me to break down every thought I have. I imagine the more of it I’ve seen, the more clear the larger picture will become.

In the meantime, I leave you with the first thought I have on the promotion right now, a paraphrase of the final scene of Almost Famous.

“What do you love about PROGRESS?”

“To begin with? Everything.”

The Lady J Says